Princess Diana captured the world's imagination, so much so, many thought they really knew her. The reality is, they just knew a part of the Diana story. CBS News explores the public and private life of a complex woman and the lingering questions surrounding her death. 

"Her name was Diana and the world fell in love with her," "CBS This Morning" co-host Gayle King says in "Princess Diana: Her Life | Her Death | The Truth" airing Monday at 8/7c on CBS. "But her fairy tale life also had a heartache – it did not have a happily ever after ending."

This summer it will be 20 years since the death of Diana, Princess of Wales. To mark the anniversary, King anchors the broadcast from Althorp, the princes

s's family estate in England. Through the words of those who knew her, who admired her, in her own words, and through the rich archive of CBS News, the special looks at the impact Princess Diana had on Britain, the monarchy and the world and features interviews with close friends who open up about their personal conversations Princess Diana in the weeks leading up to her death. In fact, friend Lana Marks reveals something surprising -- the man who was the only one true love of her life.

From her wedding to Prince Charles in 1981 until her tragic death on Aug. 31, 1997 in a horrific car crash in the Pont de I'Alma road tunnel in Paris, Princess Diana was a public draw, but there was much more behind the headlines most people never knew.

"I think Diana's death robbed the world of an extraordinary, luminous character," says author Patrick Jephson. "She leaves an unfillable gap on the world stage."

Behind the crown and the designer dresses, Diana was a complicated and occasionally unpredictable woman, say those who knew her best.  "She always said, 'I want to be normal,'" says Ken Wharfe, her former bodyguard. "The tragedy is, with being a member of the royal family, it's almost impossible to be normal."

She was far from normal. In fact, the marriage that captured the hearts of people around the world was a struggle. In public they played their parts, but in private it was a different story. They would fight, says author Sally Bedell Smith, and she would taunt Prince Charles by telling him he'd never be king.

"And there was one moment when they were having a big fight, and he was down on his knees praying, and Diana was hitting him even as he was praying," Bedell Smith says. "That was the kind of intensity of the discord that they had."

Just as the world watched as Prince Charles and Diana married, they watched as the marriage unraveled. They also followed along as Princess Diana reemerged in public life alone after the divorce and right up until she died. At the time, the summer of 1997 was supposed to be a time of self-discovery and new beginnings. She was no longer a member of the royal family and was dating businessman Dodi Al Fayed. It all ended when they piled into a Mercedes and sped off from the Ritz hotel in Paris with paparazzi chasing them.

When the Mercedes reached the Pont de I'Alma road tunnel, driver Henri Paul lost control. He sideswiped a slower moving white Fiat that drove off.

Her death was just as controversial as her life. Almost immediately conspiracy theories were raised about what happened. Were the paparazzi somehow responsible? Had someone tampered with the Mercedes? What about that white Fiat? Did the driver intentionally cause the crash? And what could have been done to prevent the crash?

At Buckingham Palace, Princess Diana's former home, the flag did not immediately fly at half mast, raising even more questions.

The two-hour special, produced by the team at "48 Hours," also takes viewers on a journey through the four independent investigations in two separate countries that followed. The broadcast examines each of the theories and finally puts to rest what really happened the night she was killed in a car crash.

"It was just not the kind of ending one would have expected for anyone, let alone Diana," says Ingrid Seward, editor of Majesty Magazine.

"Princess Diana:Her Life | Her Death | The Truth" also features interviews with journalist Richard Kay, writer Peter York, Diana's friend and employer Mary Robertson, historian David Starkey, dancer Wayne Sleep and others.

MILAN (Reuters) - European shares rose slightly in early deals on Friday, timidly recovering from heavy losses suffered earlier this week after U.S. political turmoil fuelled worries over U.S. President Donald Trump's stimulus plans, denting risk appetite.

 

The pan-European STOXX 600 index rose 0.3 percent by 0725 GMT, but was down  1.5 percent on the week, its biggest weekly loss since early November. Britain's FTSE was up 0.4 percent and euro zone blue chips added 0.3 percent.

 

While gains were spread across all sectors, pharma stocks and financials gave the biggest boost to the STOXX with shares in heavyweight drugmaker Roche up 0.6 percent, helped by a Barclays price target upgrade, and Spanish lender Banco Santander up 0.8 percent. 

 

Among the biggest movers was Dufry, up 6.9 percent after luxury group Richemont  bought a 5 percent stake in the company.

 

Hikma shares fell 4.9 percent after the drugmaker trimmed its revenue forecast to account for the delay in its U.S. generic drug launch.

 

This week's losses have pulled the stocks down from 21 month highs hit after a run driven by big fund inflows into Europe, solid macro data and surprisingly strong corporate earnings. 

 

With 80 percent of European companies having reported so far, 65 percent of them have beaten expectations and 8 percent have met them, according to I/B/E/S data. First quarter earnings growth is seen at 19.4 percent, slightly below the more than 20 percent previously forecast.

 

 

 

 (Reporting by Danilo Masoni, Editing by Helen Reid)

KUALA LUMPUR (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Domestic workers in Hong Kong are being forced to sleep in toilets, tiny cubbyholes, and on balconies, activists found in an investigation that uncovered the "appalling" living conditions of maids in the wealthy financial hub.

 

In the city that employs 350,000 maids, mostly from the Philippines and Indonesia, three out of five domestic workers are made to live in unsuitable accommodation that sometimes threatens their health and safety, said rights group Mission for Migrant Wokers (MFMW).

 

In a survey of 3,000 maids, MFMW found 43 percent of the respondents said they do not have their own room and were asked to sleep in places including storage rooms, kitchens, toilets, basements, closets and on balconies.

 

Photos collected from the domestic helpers showed shocking examples. In one case, a domestic worker was made to sleep in a cubbyhole above the refrigerator and microwave oven. Another was forced to sleep in a cubbyhole over a shower.

 

Another helper slept in a tiny, 1.2-metre-high room built on a balcony, next to the laundry area.

 

"It is appalling we are allowed to do this to a domestic worker. This is modern-day slavery," lead researcher Norman Uy Carnay told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

 

"Most of this accommodation doesn't even approach basic human decency. Hong Kong is a world-class city, it shames Hong Kong to have this kind of treatment of its migrant domestic workers."

 

Carnay said maids should be given suitable accommodation even if they are in space-scarce Hong Kong, where sky-high property prices make housing unaffordable for many of the city's 7 million residents.

 

In an email to the Thomson Reuters Foundation, Hong Kong's Labour Department urged maids to lodge complaints and said employers can face action if they fail to provide suitable accommodation.

 

Asked whether sleeping in kitchens or toilets is acceptable, the department said it was "not feasible" to define what is suitable accommodation.

 

Of the 57 percent of domestic workers surveyed with their own room, one-third said their quarters also doubles as a storage area, space for laundry, a study or a room for pets, MFMW said. Fourteen percent of the 3,000 polled said they have no ready access to toilets.

 

Domestic helpers said they had no choice but to accept the conditions.

 

"We agree because we need to earn money. If we disagree, of course, we're sent to the agency or we're sent to go back home, right?" one unidentified maid was quoted by MFMW as saying.

 

Carnay urged Hong Kong to outlaw unsuitable accommodation and abolish rules that make it mandatory for maids to live with their employers.

 

At present, the rules only say employers must not force maids to sleep on beds in the corridor with little privacy, or to share a room with an adult of the opposite sex.

 

Although domestic workers generally have better protection in Hong Kong than in other parts of Asia, mistreatment in the city has come under scrutiny since the 2014 case of Erwiana Sulistyaningsih, an Indonesian maid beaten by her employer and burned with boiling water.

 

 (Writing by Beh Lih Yi @behlihyi, editing by Alisa Tang. Please credit the Thomson Reuters Foundation, the charitable arm of Thomson Reuters, that covers humanitarian news, women's rights, trafficking, property rights, climate change and resilience. Visit http://news.trust.org)

 

By Sebastien Malo

 

NEW YORK (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Girls being trafficked for sex in northern Mexico often have been forced into exploitation as under-age child brides by their husbands, a study showed on Thursday.

 

Three out of four girls trafficked in the region were married at a young age, mostly before age 16, according to Mexican and U.S. researchers in a yet-unpublished study.

 

Human trafficking is believed to be the fastest-growing criminal industry in Mexico, and three-quarters of its victims are sexually exploited women and girls, according to Women United Against Trafficking, an activist group. [nL2N1611I3]

 

Under a 2012 anti-trafficking law, those convicted of the crime can spend up to 30 years in prison. 

 

Nevertheless, nearly 380,000 people are believed to be enslaved in Mexico, according to the 2016 Global Slavery Index published by rights group Walk Free Foundation. [nL8N1I55JH] 

 

The researchers interviewed 603 women working in the sex industry in the Mexican cities of Tijuana and Ciudad Juarez, both along the border with the United States.

 

Most said they had been trafficked as under-age brides, often by their husbands, said Jay Silverman, the study's lead author and a professor of medicine at the University of California, San Diego.

 

In about half the cases, the brides were pregnant, so healthcare workers could play a critical role in thwarting sex trafficking, the researchers said.

 

"Within being provided pregnancy-related care, there's the opportunity of interviewing that girl to understand her situation," Silverman told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

 

"We can support and assist those girls to reduce the likelihood that they will become trafficked," he said.

 

Under a 2014 law, the minimum age for marriage in Mexico is 18 but girls can marry at age 14 and boys at age 16 with parental consent.

 

The researchers include members of the United States-Mexico Border Health Commission, a joint effort launched in 2000 by the two nations' governments to improve health and quality of life along the border.

 

They also came from Mexican economic institutions, and one was a medical doctor.

 

 (Reporting by Sebastien Malo @sebastienmalo, Editing by Ellen Wulfhorst. Please credit the Thomson Reuters Foundation, the charitable arm of Thomson Reuters, that covers humanitarian news, women's rights, trafficking, property rights, climate change and resilience. Visit http://news.trust.org)

 

The Alien series is filled with horrific, chest-bursting, face-hugging, acid-blood-burning moments. But somehow it's the quieter scenes that get to you, where the doom builds as the Marines' cameras start to drop off the screen one by one, or where Newt grimly notes, "They mostly come at night. Mostly."

A new "Alien: Covenant" clip released Friday isn't gore-filled, but the way it slowly builds will still make the hairs on your arms stand up straight. Daniels (Katherine Waterston) is having a friendly conversation with MUTHUR, the Covenant's onboard artificial intelligence. Until she's not anymore. And then it's time to lock and load.

"Alien: Covenant" opens May 19 in the US (May 12 in the UK, May 18 in Australia).

The closing night of the Tribeca Film Festival brought together the cast from two of the most important and influential movies ever made: The Godfather and The Godfather: Part II. Led by the festival’s co-founder, Robert De Niro, Al Pacino, Diane Keaton, James Caan, Robert Duvall, and Talia Shire took the stage with their director, Francis Ford Coppola, to look back on the iconic films after they screened back to back for the audience.

The discussion, which was led by director Taylor Hackford, focused mainly on the first film, which allowed De Niro — who only appeared in Part II  to stay almost completely silent, seemingly to the notoriously shy actor’s satisfaction.

Coppola led a good deal of the talk, which focused mainly on how chaotic much of the production was. He recalled first learning about Mario Puzo’s original novel, hearing from the men who would go on to be the film’s producers, and receiving a call from Marlon Brando (he was turning down a part in Coppola’s The Conversation) all on the same day.

Given some time to warm up, Pacino took command of the stage, delivering a lively retelling of his casting process, which was tortured, to put it lightly. Coppola had wanted Pacino, then known mainly for his work on the stage, from the get-go, but Paramount wasn’t convinced. Producer Robert Evans thought Pacino was too short - which Pacino admitted was “sorta true” - and favored someone like Robert Redford, since as Coppola pointed out, there are some fair-haired Sicilians.

A dozen or so screen tests later Pacino got the part, but his first weeks on set were troubled. He recalled hearing people on set giggling at his performance, and when Coppola showed him some of the takes from those early days, he understood. The director then moved up the famous restaurant scene in the shooting schedule in order to convince Paramount not to fire Pacino, and it worked.

Pacino was not the only person that Paramount was looking to get rid of. At one point during filming, Coppola was told that he was going to be fired that weekend. The studio had gotten the sense that things weren’t going well, and the company wanted to weekend to solidify a replacement. And perhaps channeling Don Vito, Coppola found the 12 people working on set that were his loudest “naysayers” and fired them. He wasn’t sure at the time whether that was allowed, but the move had the desired affect. Once the studio saw a reshot version of the Don’s assassination, Coppola was back on the picture, with a more loyal crew.

As the night went on, the group exchanged stories, some of which had been forgotten by other cast members. Caan, in particular, had a few wild tales that only he seemed to remember, but he would regularly forget to speak into the microphone. One of the more surreal moments of the evening came as a result, when Duvall instructed Caan to “Use your mic” in pitch-perfect Tom Hagen sternness.

Given some time to warm up, Pacino took command of the stage, delivering a lively retelling of his casting process, which was tortured, to put it lightly. Coppola had wanted Pacino, then known mainly for his work on the stage, from the get-go, but Paramount wasn’t convinced. Producer Robert Evans thought Pacino was too short - which Pacino admitted was “sorta true” - and favored someone like Robert Redford, since as Coppola pointed out, there are some fair-haired Sicilians.

A dozen or so screen tests later Pacino got the part, but his first weeks on set were troubled. He recalled hearing people on set giggling at his performance, and when Coppola showed him some of the takes from those early days, he understood. The director then moved up the famous restaurant scene in the shooting schedule in order to convince Paramount not to fire Pacino, and it worked.

Pacino was not the only person that Paramount was looking to get rid of. At one point during filming, Coppola was told that he was going to be fired that weekend. The studio had gotten the sense that things weren’t going well, and the company wanted to weekend to solidify a replacement. And perhaps channeling Don Vito, Coppola found the 12 people working on set that were his loudest “naysayers” and fired them. He wasn’t sure at the time whether that was allowed, but the move had the desired affect. Once the studio saw a reshot version of the Don’s assassination, Coppola was back on the picture, with a more loyal crew.

As the night went on, the group exchanged stories, some of which had been forgotten by other cast members. Caan, in particular, had a few wild tales that only he seemed to remember, but he would regularly forget to speak into the microphone. One of the more surreal moments of the evening came as a result, when Duvall instructed Caan to “Use your mic” in pitch-perfect Tom Hagen sternness.

 

President Tayyip Erdogan declared victory in a referendum on Sunday to grant him sweeping powers in the biggest overhaul of modern Turkish politics, but opponents said the vote was marred by irregularities and they would challenge its result.

Turkey's mainly Kurdish southeast and its three main cities, including the capital Ankara and the largest city Istanbul, looked set to vote "No" after a bitter and divisive campaign.

Erdogan said 25 million people had supported the proposal, which will replace Turkey's parliamentary system with an all-powerful presidency and abolish the office of prime minister, giving the "Yes" camp 51.5 percent of the vote.

That appeared short of the decisive victory for which he and the ruling AK Party had aggressively campaigned. Nevertheless, thousands of flag-waving supporters rallied in Ankara and Istanbul in celebration.

"For the first time in the history of the Republic, we are changing our ruling system through civil politics," Erdogan said, referring to the military coups which marred Turkish politics for decades. "That is why it is very significant."

Under the changes, most of which will only come into effect after the next elections due in 2019, the president will appoint the cabinet and an undefined number of vice-presidents, and be able to select and remove senior civil servants without parliamentary approval.

There has been some speculation that Erdogan could call new elections so that his new powers could take effect right away. However, Deputy Prime Minister Mehmet Simsek told Reuters there was no such plan, and the elections would still be held in 2019.

Erdogan himself survived a failed coup attempt last July, responding with a crackdown that has seen 47,000 people detained and 120,000 sacked or suspended from their jobs.

In Ankara, where Prime Minister Binali Yildirim addressed cheering supporters, convoys of cars honking horns clogged a main avenue as they headed toward the AK Party's headquarters, their passengers waving flags from the windows.

But opponents questioned the validity of the vote, calling for a recount and challenging a last minute decision by the electoral authorities to allow ballots to be counted that were not stamped by election officials.

The head of the main opposition Republican People's Party (CHP), Kemal Kilicdaroglu, said the legitimacy of the referendum was open to question. His party said it would demand a recount of up to 60 percent of the votes.

The chairman of the electoral board said the decision to allow unstamped ballots to be counted was not unprecedented, as the government had allowed such. In some affluent neighborhoods in Istanbul, people took to the streets in protest while others banged pots and pans at home - a sign of dissent that was widespread during anti-Erdogan protests in 2013.

In Istanbul's Besiktas neighborhood, more than 300 protesters brought traffic on a main street to a standstill, a Reuters cameraman at the scenesaid. In Ankara, scuffles between AK Party and opposition supporters broke out near the headquarters of the CHP.

 

EUROPEAN UNEASE

Turkey's lira firmed to 3.65 to the dollar in Asian trade following the referendum, from 3.72 on Friday.

European politicians, however, who have had increasingly strained relations with Turkey, expressed concern. The European Commission, the executive body of the European Union, said the close result meant that Ankara should seek "the broadest national consensus" in implementing the vote.

Relations hit a low during the referendum campaign when EU countries, including Germany and the Netherlands, barred Turkish ministers from holding rallies in support of the changes.

Erdogan called the moves "Nazi acts" and said Turkey could reconsider ties with the European Union after many years of seeking EU membership.

Former Belgian prime minister Guy Verhofstadt, who heads the liberal group of MEPs in the European Parliament, said Erdogan needed to change course, noting the result was very tight. "If Erdogan persists, EU should stop accession talks," he said.

Manfred Weber‏, leader of the center-right grouping tweeted: "No matter the result: with his referendum Pres. Erdogan is splitting his country."

After the vote Erdogan repeated his intention to review Turkey's suspension of the death penalty, a step which would almost certainly spell the end of Ankara's EU accession process.

Further deterioration in relations with the European Union could also jeopardize last year's deal under which Turkey has curbed the flow of migrants - mainly refugees from wars in Syria and Iraq - into the bloc.


"This is our opportunity to take back control of our country," said self-employed Bayram Seker, 42, after voting "Yes" in Istanbul.The referendum has bitterly divided the nation. Erdogan and his supporters say the changes are needed to amend the
current constitution, written by generals following a 1980 military coup, confront the security and political challenges Turkey faces, and avoid the fragile coalition governments of the past.

"I don't think one-man rule is such a scary thing. Turkey has been ruled in the past by one man," he said, referring to modern Turkey's founder Mustafa Kemal Ataturk.

Opponents say it is a step toward greater authoritarianism.

Erdogan and the AK Party enjoyed a disproportionate share of media coverage in the buildup to the vote while the leaders of the pro-Kurdish People's Democratic Party (HDP), which opposes the changes, have been in jail for months.

"I voted 'No' because I don't want this whole country and its legislative, executive and judiciary ruled by one man," said Hamit Yaz, 34, a ship's captain, after voting in Istanbul.

Proponents of the reform argue that it would end the current "two-headed system" in which both the president and parliament are directly elected, a situation they argue could lead to deadlock. Until 2014, presidents were chosen by parliament.

The government says Turkey, faced with conflict to the south in Syria and Iraq, and a security threat from Islamic State and PKK militants, needs strong and clear leadership.

 

The package of 18 amendments would give the president the authority to draft the budget, declare a state of emergency and issue decrees overseeing ministries without parliamentary approval.

Perhaps more than any other feature of the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival, the stage and space designed by the Los Angeles-based Do Lab gives fans the impression of a mirage wavering in the dusty desert heat.

Tilted, rickety-looking towers made of wooden pallets defined the Do Lab’s creation one year. Another time, rainbow-striped fabric spiraled up trumpet-shaped frames that doubled as sculptures and sun shades.

On Friday, April 14, Coachella-goers were greeted with a new design: an origami-like dome with eight triangular openings, rising to a sort of smokestack in the center and stretched with blue, orange and yellow fabric.

 

 

Founded by twins Josh and Jesse Flemming and their younger brother Dede, the Do Lab is back for a 13th year at the ever-expanding music festival at Indio’s Empire Polo Club.

And the aesthetic they absorbed on visits to Burning Man has added a touch of fantastic chaos to the well-oiled machine Coachella has become.

The festival gates opened Friday to 125,000 people for the first of two weekends of large-scale art installations, culinary offerings such as Peruvian burritos and artisanal marshmallow s’mores, and wide-ranging musical performances including Friday-night headliner Radiohead, with Lady Gaga and Kendrick Lamar to follow on Saturday and Sunday, respectively.

 

 

Even with the weather at a manageable high-80s level for opening day, the Do Lab was crowded with people seeking the annual ritual of dancing ’til they broke a sweat, then basking in the spray of water guns fired from the stage.

 

EVOLVING EXPERIMENT

 

 

The idea for the Do Lab was born around 2004, when the Flemming brothers – Pennsylvania transplants looking for creative careers in Los Angeles – realized their TV production jobs weren’t stimulating, Dede Flemming said.

Jesse played in a band, Josh worked on lighting and then set designs for his shows, and Dede helped.

 

 

“We were always just trying to go the extra mile and just make things more visually appealing,” Dede said.

Meanwhile, they were going to festivals and drawing inspiration from the creative anarchy of Burning Man, which creates an ephemeral city of art in the Nevada desert.

The Do Lab’s first year building at Coachella was 2005, when the brothers made what they considered an art project, a 60-foot geodesic dome with sculptures and water misters that was a place to cool off.

But since they bring music wherever they go, Jesse Flemming said, “It kind of turned into this little party inside the middle of the festival.”

 

Coachella invited them back, and they began experimenting with different types of building materials and bigger structures. Meanwhile, the Do Lab became known as a stage for not just music but performance art, with the audience as part of the act.

People wear glitter, sequins and fur, and everybody dances with abandon, said fan Heidi Hernandez, 32, who comes from Las Vegas to attend the festival.

“Everywhere you turn something new and cool is happening,” she said. “You literally just turn into like a wild animal there, but you don’t feel weird about doing it.”

 

 

That’s what the Do Lab is aiming for: an immersive experience, Jesse said.

“We always enjoyed it when the show was kind of surrounding you and performers were popping up all over the place and things got really weird, and it kind of gave people the freedom to express themselves.”

The Do Lab’s evolution from a simple shady space wth a DJ to a work of art you can dance in somewhat describes what has happened to festival culture at large. And many of the artists who have started at the Do Lab have graduated to spots on Coachella’s other stages. Others come back to do hotly anticipated “surprise” sets at the Do Lab.

 

 

Coachella now features major art installations and an array of food offerings in addition to a varied menu of music, and other events compete to give fans something memorable and unique.

“Festivals have recognized that it is the (overall) experience,” said Tucker Gumber, of Los Angeles, an avid fan who created a festival smartphone app FestEvo and by this summer will have clocked 10,0000 hours at festivals.

“Every minute of every day needs to be fun, not just the headliners,” he said. “It needs to be an adventure.”

The Bosnian Supreme Court has ordered the detention of five former Bosnian officials, including a former interior minister, Bakir Alispahic, on suspicion of terrorism and espionage. A lawyer for Mr Alispahic is reported as saying his client and the other four officials are to be detained for 30 days. Mr Alispahic, the former head of the Muslim-led intelligence service (AID) and two former senior AID officials, Irfan Ljevakovic and Enver Mujezinovic, are also charged with abuse of office. Police allege that the accused co-operated with the Iranian intelligence agency to establish a terrorist training camp in the Bosnian mountains. The targets are reported to have been political opponents of the Party for Democratic Action (SDA), led by Alija Izetbegovic.

Jose Mourinho believes he is held to a different standard to other Premier League managers, including Chelsea boss Antonio Conte.

Manchester United take on Mourinho 's former side Chelsea at Old Trafford on Sunday afternoon looking to close the gap on the top four, while their opponents lead the race for the title.

 

Bur while Conte has been hailed for the rapid change in fortunes at Stamford Bridge, Mourinho believes he would be criticised for employing a similar style to the Italian, while his record in his first season at United is analysed in a negative way.

The Portuguese pointed to United's strong away record, and League Cup victory, as positives quickly forgotten by his detractors.

He told Sky Sports: "I know that you like to criticise me, so when I was winning titles with Chelsea, you were criticising the style of play. In this moment to be the best counterattacking team in the country is not to be criticised anymore - it is an amazing thing."But the reality is the best team is the team that wins more matches and at the end of the season are champions, and obviously we are far from it."

Mourinho added: "It depends on how you analyse it. You could say my record at home is very bad, or my record away from home is very good. You say my home record is very bad.

"You could say I win a trophy in my first season but you forget it too soon."

Mourinho admits that United need to be challenging for titles rather than Champions League qualification, but has outlined five factors that he believes make up a successful first campaign in Manchester.

"For me a good season is to be ready for every match, to fight every match for the best result and to defend Man United prestige," he said. "To play for the fans, for the love they have for the team and for the club to play every match with a great attitude.

"We could have better results but we could also have worse results. The Europa League is one (competition), eight teams can win it and we are one of the eight teams.

"In the Premier League we are not fighting for the title, we are fighting for top four which is an important thing but the nature of this club is to fight for titles and the only title we can win now is the Europa League."

 

“WHAT DO YOU see?” That’s a question put forth in the first trailer for this December’s Star Wars: The Last Jedi—and trust us, you’ll want to watch the above clip plenty of times, just to take everything in. Picking up where 2015’s The Force Awakens left off, the Rian Johnson–directed Last Jedi clearly focuses on the relationship between the now-grizzled Luke Skywalker (Mark Hamill) and the upstart Rey Westilldontknowherlastname (Daisy Ridley). In the trailer, we watch as Rey takes her first steps toward fully understanding the Force—in one memorable shot, she practices her lightsaber skills on a cliff overlooking the sea—and we listen as Luke tells her the “one truth” about the future of the Jedi. (Hint: It ain’t too promising!)

But there’s plenty more dazzling Star Wars imagery to absorb here, from a TIE-blasting Millennium Falcon to lightsaber-wielding Kylo Ren to a brief shot of Carrie Fisher as the late General Organa. Oh, and Finn’s here, too! And Poe! And, of course, the still-rollin’ BB-8! We’ll find out how they’re all faring in that galaxy far, far away when Star Wars: The Last Jedi opens December 15.

Secretary-General Kofi Annan intends to appoint a senior police official from Denmark as the next head of the law enforcement component of the United Nations Mission in Bosnia and Herzegovina?s (UNMIBH), a UN spokesman announced today in New York. Police Commander Sven Christian Frederiksen will succeed the current Commissioner of UNMIBH?s International Police Task Force (IPTF), Vincent Coeurderoy of France, upon the expiration of the latter?s tour of duty at the end of the month. As the UN Mission is scheduled to complete its mandate by the end of this year, Mr. Frederiksen will also continue on as the first head of the EU Police Mission (EUPM) that is slated to take over from UNMIBH the responsibility for building up the local police force. To ensure a smooth transition and continuity between the two Missions, Mr. Frederiksen?s primary task will be to bring UNMIBH to a successful conclusion, the spokesman said, noting that the EU will appoint a senior officer to undertake the planning for the EUPM under Mr. Frederiksen?s general supervision.

Christians believe Jesus was mocked publicly and crucified on a solemn Friday two thousand years ago. Today, the calamitous day is celebrated as Good Friday.

But what’s so good about that?

 

One answer is that at the time of Jesus’ crucifixion, “good” may have referred to “holy” in Old English, a linguistic theory supported by many language experts.

According to Slate, the Oxford English Dictionary notes the Wednesday before Easter was once called “Good Wednesday.” Today, it’s more commonly known as Holy Wednesday.

And Anatoly Liberman, a University of Minnesota professor who studies the origins of English words, told Slate if we consider the alternative names for Good Friday, such as “Sacred Friday” (romance languages) or “Passion Friday” (Russian), this theory makes a lot of sense.

 

A third answer, some believe, is that the “good” in Good Friday was derived from "God” or “God’s Friday” — the way the term “goodbye” comes from a contraction of the phrase “God Be With You.”

 

Still, not everyone refers to this day as Good Friday. For example, 

The Catholic Encyclopedia mentions that, in the Greek Church, the holiday is known as "the Holy and Great Friday." In German, it's referred to as "Sorrowful Friday

In a rare display of unity in their ethnically divided country, Bosnians reveled Monday, in the success of director Danis Tanovic, whose film "No Man's Land" won this year's Oscar for best foreign language movie. Both in the Muslim-Croat and Serb regions of the country, ordinary people, politicians and Tanovic's fellow film-makers said for once everyone had a reason to celebrate after the devastating war which raged between 1992 and 1995. Foreign Minister Zlatko Lagumdzija said 33-year-old Tanovic's success had projected a new image of Bosnia "not as a country of problems but as a country which has a future, because it has talented and determined people." "The crown of this success is the Oscar, and Tanovic showed with his example that determination and talent never lose a battle," the minister said. The film by the Sarajevan, who now lives in Paris, tells a tragi-comic tale of three soldiers -- two Serbs and a Muslim -- trapped in an open trench during the Bosnian war. One of them is lying on a mine that will explode if he is removed. The United Nations (news - web sites) peacekeepers who get involved are shown as powerless, a view shared by many in Bosnia based on their own wartime experiences. On a snowy day in the war-scarred capital Sarajevo, taxi driver Mevludin Rakic said he was proud of the film's success. "I am so excited about the Oscar award and especially about the fact that Tanovic said this is also an Oscar for Bosnia," he said, referring to the director's victory speech. "MEANINGLESSNESS OF WAR" In Banja Luka, capital of Bosnia's Serb Republic, taxi driver Dragan, 44, also praised the film. "It shows the meaninglessness of the war here and that ordinary people suffered in it," he said. Tanovic, who ran the Bosnian government army's film archive during the war before leaving for Brussels to finish film school, shot his debut work with a budget of $1 million raised from several European producers. Professors and colleagues from Sarajevo university's school of acting and directing said they were overwhelmed by his win. "The only thing I can say now is 'Thank you, Danis'. He is a legend," Srdjan Vuletic, who studied with Tanovic before and during the war, told Reuters after a modest victory ceremony at the Bosnian film-makers' association. "This marks the beginning of a new era in Bosnian film-making," said Vuletic, who has won international awards for short movies and hopes to start shooting his first feature soon. Vuletic said he hoped Tanovic's success would give an opportunity to other budding film-makers to make movies in Bosnia instead of trying to find funding abroad.
An estimated 1,500 workers protested in Banja Luka last month, complaining they are severely underpaid -- and many haven't even been paid the meager salaries they're owed. "Some workers face years of back pay," AFP noted. Unemployment in the Serb-controlled sector of Bosnia is estimated at 39 percent, AFP said.
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